People and processesChange ManagementAgents of Transformation Report reveals the need for elite technologists

Agents of Transformation Report reveals the need for elite technologists

Agents of Transformation urgently needed to drive innovation as 86 percent of IT professionals fear their organisation lags behind the most innovative IT teams.

The Agents of Transformation Report has revealed the urgent need for Agents of Transformation to drive innovation and enable organisations to thrive in the face of rapid technological advancement. The research also highlighted a number of public sector specific findings.

The report by AppDynamics, a Cisco company, also identifies why now is the time for organisations to identify and nurture Agents of Transformation, and explores the huge opportunities for technologists wanting to accelerate their careers, and the challenges they may face along the way.

Technological advancements are transforming the world in ways we’re only beginning to imagine. The organisations who thrive are ones investing in building engaging digital experiences to deliver on growing consumer-demands. But this brings to light the dichotomy of modern technology – while the customer experience has never been more simple and elegant, it has never been more complex and difficult for businesses and IT teams to deliver. Organisations almost never understand the connection between the changes they make and the impact these changes have on customer experience and business performance until it is too late.

The Agents of Transformation Report found that only 22 percent (17 percent UK) of global technologists are very optimistic that their organisation is ready for the rapid pace of technological change. To keep up with these increasing demands, IT leaders who can build agile technology platforms to meet the ever-changing needs are required. According to the research, conducted by Insight Avenue, these leaders will be a new breed of technologist – the Agents of Transformation – with the personal skills and attributes needed to drive innovation, improve user engagement and accelerate business outcomes.

The Agents of Transformation

The goal of the research was to identify the characteristics and environments that technologists need in order to drive effective and sustainable culture change for their organisations. What emerged were five distinct typologies of technologists (The Five Types of Technologist eBook). Among them are Agents of Transformation, a group of elite technologists that are already primed and equipped to harness change and be the digital business leaders that companies truly need.

Agents of Transformation possess the personal skills and attributes needed to drive innovation, and they operate within organisations that have the right culture, leadership and tools in place to enable successful digital and business transformation. They find themselves at the forefront of transformation initiatives, but they never stand still. They recognise the need for constant personal development and learning in order to remain relevant and fulfil their ambitions.

Public Sector specific findings from the report include:

  • Only 12 percent of IT workers in the public sector are completely optimistic that their organisation is ready for the rapid pace of technological advancement, less than the all industry average of 22 percent
  • While almost two thirds (62 percent) of IT professionals in the public sector worry that technology innovation is outpacing society’s ability to harness it and adapt to change
  • One percent of IT professionals in the public sector are Agents of Transformation compared to a global average of 9 percent. The biggest proportion of retail IT workers are ‘Frustrated Innovators’ the most of all the other industries
  • Today, only one percent of public sector technologists are Agents of Transformation

Huge opportunity for technologists

  • 69 percent of IT professionals in the public sector care deeply about how technology is changing the world, marginally less than the all industry average (71 percent)
  • 72 percent of public sector IT professionals believe that emerging technologies will give them opportunities to develop their skills and their careers, just under the all industry average (76 percent)
  • 63 percent want their career to leave a lasting and positive legacy, lower than the all industry average (69 percent)
  • Technologists view digital transformation and innovation as a huge opportunity for them personally, with 91 percent in the public sector identifying at least one factor that excites them about becoming an Agent of Transformation

The time to act is now

  • Recruiting new talent is the biggest concern for the public sector
  • 50 percent of public sector respondents reported feeling overlooked by their organisation (compared to an all industry average of 48 percent), and almost half (47 percent) are likely to leave their current organisations within the next two years

Barriers to overcome

Cultural barriers:

  • 88 percent of public sector IT professionals think their organisation lags behind the most forward/innovative IT team in their country in terms of skills, qualities and knowledge, and 48 percent see themselves lagging more than five years behind
  • 56 percent of public sector respondents say their organisation does not encourage technology professionals to embrace the creative, future looking side of technology
  • 49 percent of public sector technologists’ day to day activity is having a positive impact on the business or driving innovation

Leadership and job satisfaction:

  • Only 17 percent of IT directors and managers in the public sector feel their full potential is being achieved in their current role, compared to an all industry average of 26 percent
  • 60 percent of public sector technologists say too much of their time is spent keeping existing software and systems up and running, on par with the all industry average (60 percent)
  • 55 percent say that often their work in IT is so reactive, they forget what attracted them to technology in the first place, compared to an all industry average of 58 percent

Outdated tools and skills:

  • 59 percent of public sector technologists say there is a surplus of outdated technology within their IT department, compared to an all industry average of 56 percent
  • 87 percent do not have access to the software and tools they need to turn data into real time, context specific insight, compared to an all industry average of 85 percent
  • 50 percent of public sector respondents do not have access to the data they need to achieve innovation goals, compared to an all industry average of 49 percent

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