Innovation and changeGovernment TechnologyPAC slams government procurement processes

PAC slams government procurement processes

A new report by the Public Accounts Committee (PAC) has found that the government procurement process incentivised a focus on tendering and winning bids, not ensuring the right supplier.

The report slams the government for its repeated failure to ensure contractors can do what they are bidding for at the price they are bidding, its relationship with Carillion and an abject failure to encourage SMEs to engage.

The report also highlights further concerns regarding contract specification, transparency, use of SMEs and role of the Cabinet Office – and suggests government must be more assertive in forming the market for procurement.

PAC Committee Chair, Meg Hillier MP commented: “The Public Accounts Committee has long highlighted weaknesses in Government contracting and the lessons it must learn if it is to outsource effectively for the benefit of service users and taxpayers.

“The collapse of Carillion in January sharpened our focus on the relationship between Government and its Strategic Suppliers—companies that receive over £100m in annual revenue from Government contracts.

“Vast sums are invested across vital public services, with far-reaching impacts on the lives of citizens. It is critical that their money is spent wisely and with their best interests at heart.

“This report, which follows our publication of Government’s Carillion risk assessments and new evidence taken from Government and Strategic Suppliers, makes important recommendations in this direction. In particular, we have identified a need for Government to be more assertive in shaping the markets in which it operates, with a renewed focus on driving value for taxpayers’ money.

“It must look with fresh eyes at the motivations of companies currently bidding for central government work, and develop a strategy that requires contract-awarding bodies to look beyond bottom-line costs. Crucial to this will be to embed procurement best practice across departments. For example, there must be clearer specification of contracts, properly scoped, so that when any deal is signed there is an agreed understanding between Government and supplier of what is being paid for, and over what timescale.

“There are many areas in which the Cabinet Office can drive compliance across departments—not least turning its proposed ‘playbook’ of guidelines, rules and principles for contracting into a set of mandatory requirements.

“We encourage it to respond positively to the recommendations set out in our report and take the necessary steps to ensure its authority is better felt.”

The full report can be found here.

Related Articles

Civil Services gets a guidance document for Outsourcing Decisions and Contracting

Digital Procurement Civil Services gets a guidance document for Outsourcing Decisions and Contracting

5m Jay Ashar
A bold approach to procurement will pay off 

Digital Procurement A bold approach to procurement will pay off 

8m Austin Clark
G-Cloud 10 opens for business

Digital Procurement G-Cloud 10 opens for business

1y Austin Clark
Redcar and Cleveland signs deal to transform revenues and benefits services

Digital Customer Service Redcar and Cleveland signs deal to transform revenues and benefits services

1y Austin Clark
New framework agreement for Yorkshire and Humber

Digital Procurement New framework agreement for Yorkshire and Humber

1y Austin Clark
Continuing austerity ahead as Government grapples with £300bn public spending gap

Data Insight Continuing austerity ahead as Government grapples with £300bn public spending gap

1y Austin Clark
Capita announces £513m annual loss

Digital Procurement Capita announces £513m annual loss

1y Austin Clark
Q&A: Managing shadow IT

Data Insight Q&A: Managing shadow IT

1y Austin Clark