Service deliveryDigital Customer ServiceAre the hard to reach at risk of becoming ‘the hardly reached’?

Are the hard to reach at risk of becoming ‘the hardly reached'?

How can local authorities ensure they're not excluding vulnerable and disadvantaged groups online services

Insight from the recently published The State of the Digital Nation report has highlighted the need for councils to ensure vulnerable and disadvantaged groups are not excluded from online services.

A blog post published by Agilisys says that the recent report discovered that two fifths of organisations cite lack of citizen online access and half cite an unwillingness to use online services as barriers to using online government services.

The post goes on to argue that the hard to reach are at risking of becoming ‘the hardly reached’ – but does include details of a council that’s getting it right. The post can be read in full here.

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