Headline News3 steps to fixing your skill shortage – fast

3 steps to fixing your skill shortage - fast

How did Birmingham City Council attract 1,300 applications and appoint 134 social workers in 12 months?

Following a series of ‘Inadequate’ OFSTED judgements, in 2008 Birmingham City Council (BCC) made the effective recruitment of social workers a top priority.

A notoriously challenging area, BCC recognised the need for a complete overhaul of their recruitment process. An over-reliance on agency workers was a massive drain on their budget and a diminishing reputation made it increasingly difficult to attract top candidates.

So how did BCC turn this around and attract 1,300 applications and appoint 134 social workers in 12 months?

By picking the right digital and technology partner

Acknowledging that a whole different approach was required, in 2012 BCC formed a close partnership with Jobsgopublic, a leading resourcing brand who build fit for purpose technology and digital solutions solely for the public sector. The chief aims were to change the perception that social workers had of BCC and build a pipeline of experienced social workers.

By building a microsite

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Jobsgopublic devised a multi-platform campaign in which candidates were driven to a dedicated microsite and prompted to register their details on an online talent pool.

The site served as an information hub for potential applicants and featured news, events, videos and latest vacancies as well as a link to the talent pool. The use of a talent pool alongside current vacancies allowed candidates to register their interest in the event that current vacancies weren’t suitable. BCC would then be able to maintain this interest until relevant vacancies arose.

By attracting the right candidates

Jobsgopublic used a variety of attraction methods including Google, Bing and social media advertising as well as targeted emails and enhancements on Jobsgopublic.com to drive large amounts of traffic to the site.

The campaign was a huge success with the microsite receiving 61,300 unique visits which resulted in 1,282 applications and led to 134 appointments over a period of 12 months. Birmingham had transformed its reputation and become an employer of choice for ambitious social workers.

According to the Head of People Resourcing and Business Development at Birmingham City Council: “In the last 12 months we have made significant savings in both time and money and raised the council’s profile in an extremely positive way. We would have no hesitation in recommending Jobsgopublic to others; the team are always on hand to help, quick to turn things around and truly understand the area in which they operate.”

Find out how Jobsgopublic can help you overcome your recruitment challenges here.

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