InsightsG-Cloud sales reach £696m

G-Cloud sales reach £696m

Total sales for the government’s G-Cloud framework have reached £696m, with sales rising in July after a disappointing June, according to official figures.

Total sales for the government’s G-Cloud framework have reached £696m, with sales rising in July after a disappointing June, according to official figures.

There were concerns about a summer slowdown in sales but a boost of £7m in July compared to June, means this situation seems to be on the mend.

Using its updated sales figures, the Government Digital Service (GDS) has reported that its total spending for digital services in the month of July was £26,422,949 (Ex Vat).

The government’s aim of giving SME tech businesses a boost through the framework seems to be on track with 60% of sales by volume and 50% by value going to small and medium-sized enterprises.

The majority of sales made through the cloud procurement framework involved central government departments at 76 per cent, with the remaining 24 per cent attributed to other public sector bodies.

These figures were released in the same week as the Crown Commercial Service (CSS) announced that suppliers will need declare their interest for the upcoming Tender for G-Cloud 7.

Suppliers will have a window of around six weeks to submit their applications for the seventh version of the G-Cloud framework, which will go live three months later, meaning it is expected around November.

In a recent blog post, Tony Singleton, director of digital commercial programme, at the GDS, said: “SMEs are letting us know that their businesses are continuously growing both in revenue and employees.

“Not only have these frameworks reduced the barriers of entry for working with government, but are delivering real growth to the economy.”

He added: “It is important to remember that G-Cloud is more than just about sales. Both G-Cloud and the Digital Services framework are programmes with the the potential to radically transform the way that central government and the wider public sector deliver their digital services.”

In the same post, Singleton described being asked what he thought his greatest challenge was over the next 12 months.

“This is, without a doubt, getting the message further across both central government and the wider public sector about the truly transformational benefits that Cloud First can deliver,” he said.

“It is now up to us to show that the Digital Marketplace can make it clearer, simpler and faster to do this.”

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